Category Archives: Root Vegetables

Carrots, turnips, beets … the vegetables of the underground world.

To Beet or not to Beet …

that was the question (this morning).
I decided to Beet It when Michael Jackson came on the radio. It was like a calling of sort.

I have a couple of (what I call) Beet Bins. Yes, I grow Beets in bins because it gives me better control of water flow and I can move them to get more or less sunlight, depending on weather conditions and their rate of growth.

County's Recycle Bin being recycled since new ones were given out.

County’s Recycle Bin being recycled since new ones were given out.

Nice, big and ready

Nice, big and ready.

I always check for re-sprouting and this one has a few, not all will regrow, probably a couple of strong ones but they go back to nature’s bed.

Leaves & stalks will be sautéed  with sesame oil & garlic then sprinkled with malt vinegar. That will accompany my seafood fried rice for lunch.

Cleaned and ready.

Cleaned and ready.

The Beetroot is going to be steamed and then chilled. Will probably slice or grate it to add to salad with feta cheese for dinner.

Don’t you think it’s fun sowing then reaping your harvest?
Clean & chemical free. :mrgreen:

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Update: Had to change my lunch plan a little (didn’t have enough seafood) so I made Biryani Rice & Chicken Tikka Masala (using leftover chicken) to go with sautéed Beet leaves & stems.

Lunch

Lunch

 

 

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Home-grown & Home-made Daikon Kim-chi

Daikon will show up (above soil level) when they are ready for harvest.

Today, I cleared some Daikon to make space for cool weather seedlings that are ready to be planted. 1st thought that came to mind is preserving ~ resulting in a jar of Daikon Kim-chi.

Leaves and root.

Leaves and root.

Cutting of leaves into 2" length.

Cutting of leaves into 2″ length & salted.

Root cut in 2" sticks.

Root cut in 2″ sticks and mixed with salted leaves; left to cure for 2 hours, then rinsed.

My Kim-chi concoction of garlic chives, Korean chili-paste, ginger, chopped garlic, fish sauce & some sugar.

My Kim-chi concoction of garlic chives, Korean chili-paste, ginger, chopped garlic, fish sauce & some sugar.

All mixed & left at room temperature for 4 hours.

All mixed & left at room temperature for 4 hours.

My 1st jar of Daikon Kimchi for this year.

My 1st jar of Daikon Kimchi for this year to be fermented in the refrigerator for 5 days.

Any one with different ideas or recipes for preserving/pickling? Please tap me a note.

Daikon & their leaves

Daikon (which comes from the Chinese term 大根 pronounced ‘da-gern’ literally means Big Root) is of the radish family. That big white root is commonly seen in Asian markets or the oriental shelves in US supermarkets and is what most cooks use in the kitchen. Koreans use it in Kim-chi, Japanese used it in their pickles and the Ponzu sauce, Indians use it in sambar and I grew up with it in dishes like Chai Tow Kway, Lobak Soup, etc.

Sometimes also called turnip, sometimes called white carrot … almost all recipes involve the root.  Why? Because the smart growers eat the greens themselves… 😀 just kidding.

While the roots are growing (and breaking up my soil)…

still growing

still growing

I usually harvest some of their leaves for curries and stir-fry dishes.

Nice green, crunchy, mustardy leaves.

Nice green, crunchy, mustardy leaves.

Harvested leaves for tonight's dinner.

Harvested leaves for tonight’s dinner.

Those leaves are rich in potassium, manganese, vitamins A, C & E, calcium & iron ~ so why throw them away?  So for tonight ~ I made Indian Palak style curry ~ 50% in the blender; 50% added later & slow cooked. DSCN2773-tileThis was a side dish to our Turkey (leftover) Biryani Rice.

Turkey Biryani with Palak Daikon Greens

Turkey Biryani with Palak Daikon Greens

 

 

 

 

‘Down-to-Earth’ cliché

Sometimes a quirky cliché means exactly what it is meant to mean.

Carrots, the common root vegetable we see being sold everywhere, which can be eaten raw, cooked, pickled ~ your choice, are filled with nutrients. Many gardeners grow carrots in their backyards because they are easy to grow, harvest and clean… and boy! fresh carrots are delicious.

Mother Nature has rendered it all in a cycle and if patience is exercised for ONE carrot, left to live for over a year, it will bear thousands of seeds which can be saved for the following few plantings.

budding flowers

Budding ‘micro’ flowers

which will transform into a full bouquet that ants, bees, wasps, etc. will all help to pollinate. I guess the blooms taste good to these pollinators.

carrot bouquet in full bloom

A carrot bouquet in full bloom

pollinator at work

Pollinator at work

carrot harvest

carrot harvest

And with all the seeds that those micro flowers produce, you can put them back “down to earth” for the next planting and enjoy nice fresh harvest along the way.

Remember:  Leave ONE (or 2 if you like) undisturbed and you won’t need to buy carrot seeds again (ever).